Archive for February, 2012

Miso Noodle Soup with Scallops

 

This has to be one of the quickest recipes to date, but it’s nourishing and comforting without being too heavy, and it takes as long as a scallop to cook, which really is quick. I served it as a starter before a main course of my Easy Homemade Sushi, and it went down a treat. The scallops are sweet and juicy at this time of year and have tender bright orange roes, some people remove these but for me they are they best bit, try to get diver caught scallops from a good fishmonger.

Miso Noodle Soup with Scallops

Per Person

2/3 large scallops

A garlic clove finely chopped

A squeeze of lime juice

1 packet Miso Soup with Sea Vegetables

10 udon noodles, cooked as per the packet

Garnishes including fresh coriander, finely chopped chilli, ginger, spring onions

A splash of soy and toasted sesame oil

Heat a small frying pan with a little sunflower oil until smoking, pop in your scallops and chopped garlic and a good squeeze of lime.

Make up your Miso soup with a cup of boiling water in your soup bowl and add the cooked noodles.

Turn your scallops, they should be a lovely brown colour and will only take a couple of minutes to cook, it’s so easy to overcook scallops, so less is definately more. Once cooked pop the scallops on top of the noodles, and garnish with any or all of the garnishes and the soy and sesame oil.

This is a bit cheaty and easy compared to my usual recipes, but got a really good review from my tasters (wife and friend).

 

 

The Goose that laid the Giant Egg.

A Giant Goose Egg, A large Chicken Egg and a Quail Egg

I was given three lovely Goose Eggs, by my friends at Pitmans Farm to try after enquiring what they tasted like. Two of them were slightly bigger than a duck egg, but one was massive at least double the size of the others. I’m very fortunate to have some wonderful foodie friends who are proud of what they do, and also got lucky when dropping a little Smokin’ Fudge for Jan at Maddocks Farm to sample, she generously handed me a bag of her peppery organic watercress.

It popped into my head, as these things do, that they would be an ideal match, with the juicy pepperiness of the watercress offsetting the famed golden richness of the goose egg , and I was right, a simple salad of hard boiled goose egg (I wasn’t quite sure how long to boil for and so the yolk was a little harder than I had planned), with watercress and a sprinkle of sea salt, the egg was so large it was a meal all to itself.

I popped the egg into boiling water for 10 minutes as it was so huge, but 8 would probably have given a soft yolk.

They really are decadently rich, and have given me all sorts of ideas.

Giant Scotch Eggs anyone??

Smoked butter becomes something amazing!

I’m sceptical about a lot of things in life, but am always willing to be surprised, as I find myself by the whole twittering business. I’ve found it a great way to find interesting and likeminded people who are into food and writing about it. There seems to be a rich vein of talented food writers and bloggers living in Devon.

So when I recently planned to smoke some butter, I was contacted by Devons newest food blogger Mandy Foster  from Chilli & Chai who was hoping to utilise some of my smoked butter for a cunning recipe she had come up with for Smokin’ Fudge. So I sent her a sample cold smoked with Beech and Apple to give the butter a lovely sweet smokiness.

I was over the moon to then receive back a sample of the incredibly moreish Smokin’ Fudge that Mandy had made from my butter. Though I would have to say that it has turned out to be divisive, with some people loving it, and others not. I was just really pleased that Mandy had given this a go and had produced something that was unusual and innovative, and I’m most definitely in the love it camp, the more I eat the more I want to keep nibbling on it.

Mutton dressed as lamb?

I always value leftovers, they can quite often be the best part of cooking, and I can get very excited by the prospect of cooking with something as wonderful as the mutton leftovers from the previous post.

Shepherds Pie is a family favourite of ours, and so it was the obvious choice for the mutton. It cheered my poorly son up who’s had the lurgy going round the last few weeks, he polished off a big bowl full.

Shepherds Mutton Pie

Brown off a diced onion and a couple of garlic cloves in a little oil with a sprig of finely chopped rosemary in a shallow casserole dish, add a couple of diced carrots, parsnips and half a swede and allow to sweat for 5 minutes.

Add a tin of chopped tomatoes and a litre of beef/lamb stock, and  a couple of handfuls of finely diced leftover mutton/hoggett/lamb and simmer  with the lid off until the sauce starts to thicken up.

Allow to cool for a few minutes and then top generously with buttery mash potato or sweet potato. Bake in the oven at 180degC for 50 minutes until the top is crisp and brown with the sauce bubbling over the edge.

Serve with peas and brown sauce (my wife got me into this).

 

 

An afternoon BBQ mutton shoulder

I was given a wonderful shoulder of mutton from my friends at Pitmans Farm with the caveat that it was one of their older sheep, and would take a lot of cooking, so I thought what better way to treat this large hunk of meat but cook it low and slow on the hot smoker for the afternoon.

I made up a wet rub with an ancho chilli, some oregano, sea salt, a couple of allspice berries, some black pepper, a little white wine vinegar and some water to loosen the mix. I blitzed this in my spice grinder and then rubbed into the mutton.

I fired up the smoker and hot smoked the shoulder for 7 hours until it reached a temperature of 170 deg F and so was well done, usually I’d go for medium for lamb, but this needed some proper cooking. I would ideally have liked to cook it a little more, up to 190 deg F, but the meat was so tasty, succenlent and tender I was more than happy.

It was perfect served with home made flat breads, coleslaw, and some “Holy Fuck” chilli sauce.

From Beast to Beauty Part 2

A Devon Hogs Pudding might not win any beauty contests, it’s a cooked but not browned pork sausage packed with Groats, (oats used in Devon) with lots of pepper. It’s a traditional pudding that I’d not tried until recently, and is usually sliced and fried as part of a Fry Up to be proud of.

Although there is a great case for using food ingredients where you would expect, it’s also worth mixing things up to find new combinations. Scallops and black pudding are such an unexpected combination, porky savouryness and sweet juicy scallops.

Here’s the westcountry version, the same juicy scallops but the nutty porkiness of the hogs pudding.

Scallops on a Devon Hogs Pudding and Samphire Raft 

Heat a little olive oil in a frying pan, and brown off slices of hogs pudding on a medium high heat, don’t be alarmed if you hear a popping sound, this is the groats heating up and expanding. Once they are lovely and crispy brown on both sides, andplace on your serving plate.

Pop in one scallop per pudding slice in the pan, along with a handful of samphire, a good squeeze of lemon and a pinch of sea salt and coarse ground black pepper.  Brown the scallops quickly on both sides, remove the samphire and place a few strands on each pudding, followed by a scallop and a squeeze of lemon.

Great with some ice cold bone dry cider.

From beast to a beauty

These cod roes, are certainly not the prettiest of ingredients, but for me they are a wonderful seasonal treat, that would normally be wasted.

Given a cure for a few hours with a handful of sea salt, and then cooked for a few minutes in boiling water, and smoked over beech and apple, they make for something far more beautiful and a pleasure to eat, my 2 year old couldn’t get enough, lovely served simply in slices on a cracker or crostini with a small piece of lemon.

Cod roes are at their best now, a good fishmonger should be able to source smoked roes too.

 

Jack Knight Cooks

From My Kitchen to Yours

Whisked Away Bakery

Blue sky baking

BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT

Stories from the hearth

The BBQ World of mrdodd

Making simple food great, and great food right.

Bathrooms, Kitchens and Bedrooms

Devon based bathroom installations

UK BBQ Review

UK BBQ Review site

The Munch and Tattle

A Blog About Food (Mostly BBQ and Grill): Trying everything once and telling you all about it. Good or bad! Blogging from areas around Newport and Cardiff, South Wales.

bake affairs

Bridget`s Bakery Blog

Cornelius Veakins

Outdoor BBQ Chef

CountryWoodSmoke UK BBQ

British BBQ- All the best of UK BBQ, Cooking outdoors whatever the weather.

Country Skills for Modern Life

Some of the cool and useful food, craft and sustainability skills that your grandparents knew, but probably didn't teach you!

GourmetGloucestershireGirl

An exploration of all things foodie in Gloucestershire!

theshotgunchef.wordpress.com/

Hunting chef William Alldis shows you how to live off the land and create mouthwatering recipes for peanuts! Grow it, forage it, kill it, cook it and enjoy it.

Running Buffet

One man's quest to exercise enough so that he can eat all of the good things that exist in the world

The Knight of the Round Table

Musings and recipes from my kitchen to yours

Jack Knight Cooks

From My Kitchen to Yours

Whisked Away Bakery

Blue sky baking

BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT

Stories from the hearth

The BBQ World of mrdodd

Making simple food great, and great food right.

Bathrooms, Kitchens and Bedrooms

Devon based bathroom installations

UK BBQ Review

UK BBQ Review site

The Munch and Tattle

A Blog About Food (Mostly BBQ and Grill): Trying everything once and telling you all about it. Good or bad! Blogging from areas around Newport and Cardiff, South Wales.

bake affairs

Bridget`s Bakery Blog

Cornelius Veakins

Outdoor BBQ Chef

CountryWoodSmoke UK BBQ

British BBQ- All the best of UK BBQ, Cooking outdoors whatever the weather.

Country Skills for Modern Life

Some of the cool and useful food, craft and sustainability skills that your grandparents knew, but probably didn't teach you!

GourmetGloucestershireGirl

An exploration of all things foodie in Gloucestershire!

theshotgunchef.wordpress.com/

Hunting chef William Alldis shows you how to live off the land and create mouthwatering recipes for peanuts! Grow it, forage it, kill it, cook it and enjoy it.

Running Buffet

One man's quest to exercise enough so that he can eat all of the good things that exist in the world

The Knight of the Round Table

Musings and recipes from my kitchen to yours