Posts Tagged ‘Recipe’

Chicken, Bacon and Avocado Skewers

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Chicken….check, Bacon……oh yes, Avocado………what?

Yes Grilled Avocado is surprisingly delicious, you still get the lovely creaminess of the ripe avocado, but the edges caramelise beautifully and add a smoky creamy elegance to the kebab. I used quality chicken breast that I diced into large chunks. These went onto the skewers, with strips of back bacon, and chunks of the avocado alternately.

I cooked these on a red hot grill to crisp up the edges and brushed with chilli jam for a little sweetness until the chicken was cooked through, and only took around 5 minutes on a very hot hibachi grill.

This works….try it.

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Birch Log Roast Salmon

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As an alternative to the Dirty style of cooking I’ve been using a lot recently, this style of cooking doesn’t really benefit most fish, but plank roasting, and in this case Birch Log Roasting, works extremely well, protecting the fish from the direct heat but roasting and smoking it to perfection.

I used a little sea salt and a pinch of BBQ seasoning, on the salmon fillets and placed them on a birch log that I’d rubbed with a little olive oil on the top to stop the fish sticking. I nestled the log in the coals on a medium hot BBQ, I used a Kamado Joe from Outdoor Gourmet which is ideal for this kind of cooking. With the lid closed the sweet birch smoke was able to penetrate the fish and cook it perfectly, it took about 10-12 minutes. The bottom of the log will char up and smoke, make sure you have some heavy duty oven gloves or tongs for removing the log.

I served the salmon with a flower salad, and some herby couscous.

Smoked Hough and Venison Feijoada.

feijoida

This is a really warming, rich bowl of food, that will really hit the spot. Feijoada is a Brazillian stew, usually made with cheap cuts of cured pork, such as this lovely Smoked Hough (hock), you can use a ham hock from a good butcher, and also used some leftover venison shin I had, but you could use beef or veal shin.

Brown off the Hough and shin in a large deep casserole dish in a splash of rapeseed oil, then add a couple of  chopped shallots, a couple of chopped garlic cloves and a pinch of salt over a low to moderate heat until soft and brown, add a handful of diced chorizo and allow to cook off until the russet coloured oils leach out. Add 2 or 3 bay leaves followed by a tin of black beans, a carton of passata or chopped tomatoes, and then 500ml of beef stock.

Pop the lid on or cover with foil, and pop in a low oven 140degC for 3 hours You can eat at this point once the meat is falling off the bone or for the best flavour, leave to cool and place in the fridge overnight for the flavours to develop. Pull apart the meat into long shreds and remove the bones and skin.

Warm on the hob, until heated through, and serve with rice, steamed greens, I used Black Tuscan Kale, slices of orange, chopped coriander, and some chilli sauce.

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Jeremiah Weed braised short rib.

First of all apologies that the pic isn’t up to my usual quality, the nights seem to be drawing in with such speed, one minute it was lovely and sunny, the next almost pitch dark. But this little recipe is a good one that I wanted to get out to you guys anyway.

I used a dry competition rub on these lovely short ribs, but use a shop bought or homemade rub too, and smoked them for 4 hours at 120 deg C. I then popped them on a deep baking tray and poured over a bottle of Jeremiah Weed Sour Mash Brew covered with foil and popped into the oven for another 2 hours to braise in the bourbon flavoured beverage.

The results were outstanding, lovely moist meat that pulled into lovely long strands, a smoky savoury bark, and the flavours from the Jeremiah Weed vanilla and spice subtly adding a lovely complexity to the meat.

What else would you drink this with but a jam jar of Sour Mash Brew.

 

Duck Egg, Black Pudding and Arbroath Smokie Stack

I love to cook with inspiring local ingredients, most of the time this means the wonderful range of treats available in my home county of Devon, but when away working in Aberdeen, I love to search out the local treats and work out a new way of using them.

I had a lovely slice of Stornoway Black Pudding, made with lambs blood, an Arbroath Smokie, a fantastic smoky hot smoked haddock with a lovely creamy flesh, and a lovely duck egg.

I fried off the black pudding in a little rapeseed oil, with the duck egg until both were crispy on the edges (with the egg still runny of course) and then plated up with the pudding on the bottom, some flakes of the smokie, and finally the duck egg sitting proudly on top.

Cut into the egg and let the yolk ooze out through the fish and black pudding.  The rich taste of the black pudding marry well with the smoky creaminess of the smokie, and the egg simply takes this combination to a heavenly level.

Simply enjoy!

 

Venison stew with cheesy dumplings.

As winter starts getting it’s claws into us, we need something nice and hearty that will stick our ribs together. This meal will certainly do that, although if you don’t have a ready supply of venison, then some lovely beef shin will work a treat.

Vension stew with cheesy dumplings.

Toss a kilo of  diced venison in some seasoned flour, and then heat some rapeseed oil in a large casserole on a high heat until starting to caramelise, add 2 finely chopped onions, 2 chopped carrots, and a couple of chopped celery sticks, and a finely chopped clove of garlic, 10 crushed juniper berries (these go great with game especially venison), some chopped herbs, rosemary and thyme are the best, a good splash of red wine, and pop the lid on until everything softens for a few minutes.

Take the lid off and turn the heat to medium and cook for another 10 minutes, add a couple of litres of good beef stock, pop the lid on and turn to a low heat to simmer for 3/4 hours, adding water if the stew becomes too dry.

The meat should be so soft and falling apart, so taste and season as required, I like to use smoked sea salt and pepper and another clove or two of garlic.

The dumplings are no-suet dumplings from Sara Ravens inspiring Food for Friends and Family book.

Sift 200g plain flour with 2 teaspoons baking powder in a large bowl, add 4 tablespoons grated parmesan, a pinch of ground cloves and allspice, 2 tabblespoons chopped chives, a couple of pinches of salt and a pinch a black pepper, a beaten egg, and slowly mix in 120ml of milk. Using wet hands to stop the dough sticking gently form 12 balls.

Pop the dumplings on top of the stew and put the stew into a 180 deg C oven covered for 5 mins, before taking the lid off to allow the dumplings to brown for 10 mins.

Scatter the stew with chopped flat leaf parsley, and serve with mash, some steamed kale, and chunks of good bread and butter.

Enjoyed with a nice bottle of Chilean Carmenere.

Beetroot Houmous and Feta Canapes

For a delicious quick starter or canape, I love using chicory boats, and load them up with something to tickle the tastebuds, often it’s a nice smoked fish mousse, but I wanted to try something different, so I delved into my River Cottage Everyday book and came back with the Beetroot Houmous recipe, and having lots of beetroot plump and inviting in the garden decided to go for this.

Beetroot and Walnut Houmous (River Cottage)

Roast 4 medium beetroot in the oven with a dash of olive oil.

Pop these in a foodprocessor with 50g toasted walnuts, 25g breadcrumbs, a tablespoon of tahini, cumin to taste, juice from a lemon, salt and pepper, a garlic clove and a good glug of olive oil/rapessed oil, and blend until a nice coarse paste is achieved.

Break off the chicory boats, and load with a teaspoon of houmous, a crumble of feta or goats cheese, and a drizzle of olive oil and lemon juice.

Tagliatelle with hot smoked trout

With my hot smoked trout, I wanted to come up with a delicious pasta for our supper to do the fish justice.

Gently sweat a couple of finely chopped garlic cloves in a large pan, add the zest of a finely grated unwaxed lemon and the flakes of smoked fish, you can use hot or cold smoked salmon or trout. Add a good few table spoons of creme fraiche.

Meanwhile add some fresh egg tagliatelle to boiling salted water and cook until al dente, drain and add to the creamy fish, add plenty of freshly cracked black pepper, and a sprinkle of finely chopped flat leaf parsley and a little finely grated parmesan.

Salsola…a samphire alternative?

Marsh Samphire has to be one of my all time favourite vegetables, fresh, crunchy and salty it is also highly seasonal, and recently trendier and hence more expensive, so I was very pleased to come across Salsola Soda in the Real Seeds catalogue last winter. It’s a salad vegetable that is very popular in Italy and Japan, and to my taste also very similar to samphire.

It can be used raw in a salad dressed with a light lemony vinaigrette, or lightly steamed with a little butter or olive oil, a squeeze of lemon juice and a little seasoning, which was what I did.

I’ve been very impressed with the productivity of the few plants I grew, but found it quite tricky to germinate, and found it important to keep weeds at bay around the seedlings as they become swamped easily. It is definately a plant I plan to grow again next year.

 

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

With only a small kitchen garden, I feel there’s little value in growing vegetables that are cheap and easy to buy from a good vegetable shop, so I like to grow things that are slightly unusual, expensive or difficult to store.

This year instead of growing standard courgettes, I decided to grow Crook Neck Squashes which were promised to be more productive/tasty/useful than your standard courgette. With this they appear to have succeeded, though they are certainly visually an interesting shape.

The other unusual vegetable picture here is the Acocha ‘Fat Baby’, a relative of the cucumber, and tasting somewhere between a cucumber and a pepper, it is an extremely productive and vigorous climber.

So for our meal this evening, I wanted to come up with a way of using these vegetables in a meal entirely picked from our kitchen garden.

So to bulk out the meal, I used some Cavalo Nero (Tuscan Black Kale), Maris Piper Potatoes, and Onions and Garlic all picked from the vegetable garden, in the following recipe from the Riverford Cookbook.

Fry off a finely chopped onion, some garlic and chorizo in a little olive oil in a large frying pan until colouring, and the lovely juices from the chorizo are melting out, then add some cubed cooked potato, and some lightly steamed kale, and saute until the potatoes start to crisp up and season.

The Acocha and squash were sauteed with finely chopped garlic and olive oil.

The evening was lovely and sunny so we enjoyed the meal outside with a nice glass of Chilean Pinot Noir.

 

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BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT

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The BBQ World of mrdodd

Making simple food great, and great food right.

UK BBQ Review

UK BBQ Review site

The Munch and Tattle

A Blog About Food (Mostly BBQ and Grill): Trying everything once and telling you all about it. Good or bad! Blogging from areas around Newport and Cardiff, South Wales.

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Bridget`s Bakery Blog

CountryWoodSmoke UK BBQ

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