Posts Tagged ‘Scottish food’

Venison Shank braised in pinot noir.

venisonshank

 

I was given this wonderful roe venison shank, (shin on the bone), to come up with a recipe by Andrew Gordon Butchery in Aberdeen as you are probably aware I enjoy using tougher but tastier cuts and cooking them for a long time to create a little magic. The Pinot Noir is the best wine to use as it’s a very subtle red and won’t overpower the venison. ! shank will serve 1 hungry person.

I browned off the venison shank in a little rapeseed oil, and then placed on a sheet of double thickness foil and placed on a couple of cloves of garlic, a couple of banana shallots, a sprig of thyme, 4 juniper berries, a pinch of sea salt and balck pepper and a bay leaf. Bring the edges of the foil up around the shank to form a bowl, and pour in a glass of Pinot Noir followed by the same amount of light beef stock. Seal the foil package, sit on a baking tray and place in a preheated oven at 150deg C for 3-4 hours until the meat is falling apart and moist.

Serve with mustard mash and steamed kale. Pour the gravy from the bottom of the foil over the top.

A glass of the Pinot Noir would be perfect with this winter warmer.

Scottish Game Pie – A Guest Post

Dear readers, I’d like to introduce you to a friend of mine called Angus, who is a real Scottish Country Gentleman. When he bought in a couple of slices of a wonderful tasting Game Pie to work, and showed me the pics of the whole pie, I asked if he’d be interested in sharing how he made it with me, and everyone who reads the blog. So without further ado here is Angus.

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First off a big thank you to Marcus for allowing me to appear as a guest on his excellent blogsite. Since meeting the big guy through work I’ve both tried out and been inspired by the recipes and food photography here on Countrywoodsmoke. As I’ve just discovered, writing a recipe up and getting good pictures is an even greater challenge…

I’m a keen cook who is fortunate enough to live in the wilds of Scotland, and with the opportunity to satisfy my hunter-gatherer instincts right on my doorstep, the pursuit of deer, game and wild salmon for the table is a growing passion of mine. Cooking and eating animals I’ve studied, observed, stalked, shot or caught, killed, skinned, and butchered is incredibly satisfying and a huge contrast to buying sanitised, shrink wrapped portions from major supermarkets. I’m not out to preach – if you want to read about the ethical and moral arguments for doing what I do, I can recommend the chapter on game in Hugh Fearley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage Cookbook.

As we are entering the winter season and with snow already falling, I’ve been thinking more of high calorie food to ward of the cold – stews, pies and thick tasty soups, and with a freezer full of venison and some fresh rabbit and pheasant, I really fancied a go at a proper Game Pie. I spent a while on the internet researching a recipe for what I had in mind and found this excellent one by Delia, written well before she started advocating tinned mince and lobster bisque soup! –

www.deliaonline.com/recipes/cuisine/european/english/old-fashioned-raised-game-pie.html, not to be confused with her ‘Easy Game Pie’ which was written at the same time as the first two recipes I mentioned! Being Scottish I swapped the brandy for a 10 year old Aberlour Malt, which has a slight toffee flavour and also dropped the mace, which is not my favourite spice. I loved the fact that this was a ‘proper’ recipe – two days in the making and everything made from scratch – the jellied stock, the hot water pastry, the pork forcemeat and the port & whisky marinade all presented challenges and had the taste-buds tingling before I’d even warmed up the oven!

I didn’t get the presentation quite perfect and there are things I could do better next time, but the flavours won’t improve as the pie was tastier than I would have imagined – If you have the ingredients and the time, I’d really recommend this recipe as a triumph of traditional cooking.

The finished product in the photo above – lovely layering of venison, rabbit and pheasant chunks and the tasty pork forcemeat with a little rim of jellied game stock. My crusty pastry collapsed a bit but tasted just as nice!

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Haggis and Fennel Sourdough Crostini

I love to take slightly out of the ordinary ingredients and do something a little different and play a little with flavour combinations, something us food bloggers have the opportunity to do more than most.

While I’ve been working in Scotland recently, I just had to have a play with some haggis, so once I had caught my haggis in the wilds of Scotland and prepared them for cooking, I came up with the following recipe.

Slice a whole fennel bulb 0.5cm thick leaving the root on to hold together. Cook very slowly for around half an hour on a low temperature in a medium frying pan with the lid on in a little olive oil, with a chopped garlic clove and some thyme. When it’s really soft turn the heat up to brown and add a splash of good Scotch Whisky and cook until a tempting caramel brown, you will smell when it’s ready.

Set aside the cooked fennel, and brown off the slices of haggis in the same pan until brown and crisp on each side and remove, pop in a couple of slices of sourdough and toast both sides, this will soak up the lovely fennel and haggis flavours too.

Construct your crostini, place the bread on a plate, drizzle on a little olive oil, top with the fennel and then the haggis, season and serve with a wee dram of good Scotch.

 

Duck Egg, Black Pudding and Arbroath Smokie Stack

I love to cook with inspiring local ingredients, most of the time this means the wonderful range of treats available in my home county of Devon, but when away working in Aberdeen, I love to search out the local treats and work out a new way of using them.

I had a lovely slice of Stornoway Black Pudding, made with lambs blood, an Arbroath Smokie, a fantastic smoky hot smoked haddock with a lovely creamy flesh, and a lovely duck egg.

I fried off the black pudding in a little rapeseed oil, with the duck egg until both were crispy on the edges (with the egg still runny of course) and then plated up with the pudding on the bottom, some flakes of the smokie, and finally the duck egg sitting proudly on top.

Cut into the egg and let the yolk ooze out through the fish and black pudding.  The rich taste of the black pudding marry well with the smoky creaminess of the smokie, and the egg simply takes this combination to a heavenly level.

Simply enjoy!

 

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The Knight of the Round Table

Musings and recipes from my kitchen to yours

Jack Knight Cooks

From My Kitchen to Yours

Whisked Away Bakery

Blue sky baking

BUTTER WOULDN'T MELT

Stories from the hearth

The BBQ World of mrdodd

Making simple food great, and great food right.

Bathrooms, Kitchens and Bedrooms

Devon based bathroom installations

UK BBQ Review

UK BBQ Review site

The Munch and Tattle

A Blog About Food (Mostly BBQ and Grill): Trying everything once and telling you all about it. Good or bad! Blogging from areas around Newport and Cardiff, South Wales.

bake affairs

Bridget`s Bakery Blog

Cornelius Veakins

Outdoor BBQ Chef

CountryWoodSmoke UK BBQ

British BBQ- All the best of UK BBQ, Cooking outdoors whatever the weather.

Country Skills for Modern Life

Some of the cool and useful food, craft and sustainability skills that your grandparents knew, but probably didn't teach you!

GourmetGloucestershireGirl

An exploration of all things foodie in Gloucestershire!

theshotgunchef.wordpress.com/

Hunting chef William Alldis shows you how to live off the land and create mouthwatering recipes for peanuts! Grow it, forage it, kill it, cook it and enjoy it.

Running Buffet

One man's quest to exercise enough so that he can eat all of the good things that exist in the world

The Knight of the Round Table

Musings and recipes from my kitchen to yours